Sunday, 13 July 2014

Reflection

The situation in Gaza, Syria and Iraq is really sad.

I cannot imagine how much more difficult life there is at the moment during this month of Ramadhan.

I have been spending the larger part of my free time keeping myself up to date with what is happening in those places.

Their suffering must be great, and although I may not agree to their form of retaliation, I can totally understand what drives some people to take up arms and fight back against the real injustices visited upon them, their families and loved ones.

The injustices they face are real, the violence and brutality are real.

Getting these people to take up arms and exact revenge is just too easy, no matter that they will be branded terrorists by the "democratic liberators" for doing exactly the same things that the "democratic liberators" did to them and their loved ones.

That's western hypocrisy for you.

It is okay if they do it, but not okay if others who do not share their ideology do it.

And if they want to to do something dastardly like bombing a country to oblivion for their oil, they will use their media to create stories about how evil the targeted country is, or how evil the ruler is, painting a perception that will be shared globally.

Like what they did to Saddam Hussein (Iraqi Sunni), Bashar Al Assad (Syrian Alawite) and Muammar Ghadaffi (Libyan Sunni).

Something like what the Malaysian Opposition parties were doing and still doing right now.

All those countries are in a sad state right now, because people are so driven by their political agenda that they forget that politics are just a bunch of ideological balderdash that some people, with no better things to do with their time, use to puff up their own self-importance.

What I cannot understand is, why are people, who are largely well-off and privileged, willing to drive our country into anarchy and chaos only to further their own political ambitions and self-importance.

With so many examples of what the Arab Spring has done to North African and Middle Eastern countries, why are these "super educated" people still dead set upon pursuing their similar political agenda that will plunge our country into similar strife and chaos?

Why are they constantly using religious sentiments in politics when they have seen what happened when religious differences were exploited to create political intolerance on a massive scale from as far  back as the crusades, to the Spanish Inquisition, to modern day India?

Why have some of us refused to learn from history and from other examples happening around the world?

What good would it be for you to have the coveted political power, while the rest of your countrymen suffer displacement, unemployment, undernourishment, and in extreme cases such as in the occupied territories of Palestine, bombardment?

Ask Nouri al Maliki what it is like being the Prime Minister of Iraq these past eight years, and how does it feel now, now that the "marginalised" are assisting "terrorists" to terrorise him and his, in his little Baghdadi bubble.

When you are thinking of accusing others of evil, look in the mirror and question your motives, are you truly sincere in your pronouncements and actions?

Or are you just as self-serving, or more so, than the people you are accusing of the said evil deeds?

2 comments:

  1. I think the analysis/reflection is wrong. In the Arab Spring countries there is a common theme of people fighting against oppression, whether its Sunnis in Iraq now, or common people rising against a dictator. All this teaches us is that oppression is wrong. Most people could say that in Libya, Syria, Egypt and Saddam's Iraq, things were more peaceful and prosperous, but it was not the "West" but the people in each country that rose up. Those that agitate for change here may see (rightly or wrongly) similar risks and wish to usher in peaceful and measured change. If so, your solution of being happy with what you've got still exposes the country to ongoing risks. One thing I agree about you with is that religion in politics is a disaster for any country. Religions in their core nature (all of them) paint pictures of black and white and this is destructive to modern nations with people from different faiths, races, tribes and cultures. Particularly for a country as diverse as Malaysia. But I don't see how it can be changed until there is a change in attitude of the people towards zealots and evangelistas.
    To finish, BC, very glad to see your post, always interesting and worth a read. Hope you have time to blog every now and then.

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    1. re: "One thing I agree about you with is that religion in politics is a disaster for any country."

      Concur with you, here is that one dastardly act :

      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qc0nJMu2B94

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